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Category: Group Benefits

Pros & Cons Of Opening A Flexible Spending Account

Flexible spending accounts (FSAs) are associated with employer-sponsored health insurance plans. They allow you to divert a tax-deferred portion of your earnings into the account, which you can use to pay for certain healthcare-related expenses, including copayments and deductibles, and dependent-care costs. Money in an FSA must be used by the end of the plan year. However, employers may offer a grace period of up...

How Does My 401(k) Get Invested?

A 401(k) is a tax-deferred, employer-sponsored retirement savings plan that allows you to save and invest a portion of your paycheck. Your employer may contribute matching funds to your 401(k) account. The company may offer a choice of investment options, but you control how your 401(k) money is invested. What Are the Common 401(k) Investment Options? Employees can typically choose from a spread of mutual...

Traditional IRA Vs. Roth IRA

“IRA” is an abbreviation for “Individual Retirement Account.” A traditional IRA and a Roth IRA are two different retirement options, each with its own pros and cons. Depending on your circumstances, either may be a good choice for growing your retirement dollars. What Is a Traditional IRA? A traditional IRA is a retirement account for pre-tax contributions. The funds in the account can be used...

Can I Have More Than One 401(k)?

It is possible to enroll in more than one 401(k) at a time. In fact, it is not uncommon to accumulate several over a lifetime. This can occur in various situations. Scenarios that Can Lead to More than One 401(k) You may have a 401(k) account from a previous employer and enroll in a second 401(k) plan when you start a new position. This process...

What Happens To My HSA/FSA If I Leave My Job?

Many employers today are offering health savings accounts (HSAs) or flexible spending accounts (FSAs) to employees. Both types of plans allow for tax-free contributions to cover qualifying medical expenses, as detailed by the IRS. A critical difference between the two plans is you keep the funds in an HSA if you leave your job, but you lose the funds with an FSA. What Is A...

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